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Argumentative Models

Use the following models of argument as a guide to structure your work based on genre and section of your writing.

Genre

Model

Issue

Advice

Religious Studies “A Theological Reflection on Mbiti’s Conception of Salvation in African Christianity” by Adewale J. Adelakun Voice Establish authority by quoting established scholars and citing various religious texts, but be sure to stay grounded in the religion discussed
Science “Augin Triggers Microtubule-Dependent Microtubule Nucleation in Interphase Plant Cells” by Ting Liu et. al. Presenting your argument Be sure your claim is worded clearly and concisely, there should be NO room for multiple interpretations.
Science “Augin Triggers Microtubule-Dependent Microtubule Nucleation in Interphase Plant Cells” by Ting Liu et. al. Title The title of the paper should either describe the most significant finding in your research or the scientific approach you used
Philosophy of Science “More is Different” by P. W. Anderson Conclusions Try to conclude in a manner similar to your introduction. When you can tie the conclusion to the introduction, the paper appears more consistent and transparent to your audience. In addition, don’t jump to conclusions that aren’t directly indicated by your data.
Psychology “The neuronal basis of fear generalization in humans” by Selim Onat and Christian Buchel Results Although the results section should be narrow and stick to your data, it is okay to explain significance and context in that section instead of solely the discussion.
Psychology “Power, Approach, and Inhibition” by Cameron Anderson Major Premise It’s important to clearly define key, potentially subjective, terms in your paper to be sure that the audience is on the same page as the writer and avoid ambiguity. For example, this paper defines the term “power” and the determinants of power.